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About Me

Hi! My name is Ameya, and I’m a first-year at Emory. I’m from Plano, Texas, and attended the Texas Academy of Math and Science for the past two years. In terms of subjects I love to learn, neuroscience and chemistry are really exciting to me. I’ve also done scientific research in bioinformatics and biochemistry in the last few years. Some of my hobbies include playing saxophone, singing, playing basketball, and sleeping whenever I get the chance. I currently sing for Dooley Noted, so come out and take a listen whenever you get a chance.

Something relevant to this course is certainly my favorite noodles, which would have to be pad thai. I also love sushi or chocolate chip cookies. Within the past couple years, I’ve also been learning how to cook–an activity that has injured me but also led to some serendipitous creations. For this class, I can’t wait to see how food goes beyond my current perception, which is basically just as a way to keep my alive.

Thanks for reading, and be sure to let me know if you would like to grab a bite to eat (preferably pad thai, sushi, or chocolate chip cookies)!

 

Category: About me, Student Work

Domain 1 Entry

After reading an excerpt from Alan Beardsworth’s and Terea Keil’s Sociology on the Menu, I began to understand the social context behind food. After reading about models of the human food system, the identity of food, and the social act of eating, I was amazed to see how food went beyond just the concept of primal nutrition; food truly acts as a social glue of society. I was particularly in awe of how innate the perception of food and its culture is to me, yet how foreign it seemed. For example, I had always felt the cultural ties of stereotypically “soft” or “strong” foods, but I had never realized how engrossed their meanings were with gender. I also began to realize how entangled financial standing and food were. Although not explicitly said, there is always a sense of “rich” and “poor” foods. Similarly, I was surprised to read about the transition of food from a purely nutritional item to a cultural commodity. These ideas of consumerism and the economic ties of food also had me thinking of the idea that healthy foods were inherently more expensive and therefore part of the upperclass. However, after doing some outside research, I saw that the misconception actually highlights a cultural idea that fruits, vegetables, and home-cooking are actually more expensive than the deleterious cheeseburgers, fries, and dollar menus that plague poorer communities. If society were to look beyond the cultural misconception that healthy food must cost more, I began to understand how much closer to solving obesity we could be. Overall, this article had me profoundly think and question the cultural ties that food has, and more importantly, understand the social implications of what objects of nutrition (or malnutrition) we put in our bodies.

In addition to the reading, I took the learning styles test, which illustrated I learned about equally between the reflective and active areas and equally between the sensing and intuitive areas. I have a strong visual learning bend, and I’m also closer to a global learner than a sequential learner. Based on these results, I wanted to express my learning on the differences between functional, structural, and developmental approaches by writing a rap and tying in my global learning by including specific facts and characteristics of each approach to the rap.

To recap the differences, functionalism tends to compare ties in society to the functions of organic bodies. Structuralism, as opposed to functionalism, looks beyond the functions of these social parts to the more profound, underlying causes. These underlying structures are assumed to be unchanging, one of the major criticisms against structuralism. Lastly, the developmental approach is a residual area of similar philosophies that have a common theme: understanding present cultural structures requires understanding and applying knowledge of the past structures.

On a side note: I looked back on the documentary Forks Over Knives and explored some videos on YouTube to find out more about the economy disparity to which food is tied. I also found this article on the social affect that food has:

http://nutritionwonderland.com/2009/08/social-side-eating/

The Three Approaches: 

Three approaches to analyze sociology

Functionalism is related to physiology

Parts come together to influence the whole

Comparison to the human body: that’s the goal

But the fatal flaws take a toll

A bit outdated now, its lost the poll

So we move on to structuralism, a way to look beyond the surface

The deeper foundation of society: thats the purpose

That Levi-Strauss hoped for as a universal theme

Apply rules and laws for more than what they seem

A triangle to examine the transformation of food

But someone didn’t agree, Mennell was the dude

So we move on to analyzing the developmental method

One commonality is what it had suggested:

Taking into consideration past forms of social form

Mennell, Goody, and others defined these norms

Such as the influence of external and internal constraints

And the idea of gastro-anatomy that Fischler paints

All in all, these three concepts can be used

To understand the social workings of the thing we eat: FOOD.

 

 

 

 

 

Domain 1 Entry

After reading an excerpt from Alan Beardsworth’s and Terea Keil’s Sociology on the Menu, I began to understand the social context behind food. After reading about models of the human food system, the identity of food, and the social act of eating, I was amazed to see how food went beyond just the concept of primal nutrition; food truly acts as a social glue of society. I was particularly in awe of how innate the perception of food and its culture is to me, yet how foreign it seemed. For example, I had always felt the cultural ties of stereotypically “soft” or “strong” foods, but I had never realized how engrossed their meanings were with gender. I also began to realize how entangled financial standing and food were. Although not explicitly said, there is always a sense of “rich” and “poor” foods. Similarly, I was surprised to read about the transition of food from a purely nutritional item to a cultural commodity. These ideas of consumerism and the economic ties of food also had me thinking of the idea that healthy foods were inherently more expensive and therefore part of the upperclass. However, after doing some outside research, I saw that the misconception actually highlights a cultural idea that fruits, vegetables, and home-cooking are actually more expensive than the deleterious cheeseburgers, fries, and dollar menus that plague poorer communities. If society were to look beyond the cultural misconception that healthy food must cost more, I began to understand how much closer to solving obesity we could be. Overall, this article had me profoundly think and question the cultural ties that food has, and more importantly, understand the social implications of what objects of nutrition (or malnutrition) we put in our bodies.

In addition to the reading, I took the learning styles test, which illustrated I learned about equally between the reflective and active areas and equally between the sensing and intuitive areas. I have a strong visual learning bend, and I’m also closer to a global learner than a sequential learner. Based on these results, I wanted to express my learning on the differences between functional, structural, and developmental approaches by writing a rap and tying in my global learning by including specific facts and characteristics of each approach to the rap.

To recap the differences, functionalism tends to compare ties in society to the functions of organic bodies. Structuralism, as opposed to functionalism, looks beyond the functions of these social parts to the more profound, underlying causes. These underlying structures are assumed to be unchanging, one of the major criticisms against structuralism. Lastly, the developmental approach is a residual area of similar philosophies that have a common theme: understanding present cultural structures requires understanding and applying knowledge of the past structures.

On a side note: I looked back on the documentary Forks Over Knives and explored some videos on YouTube to find out more about the economy disparity to which food is tied. I also found this article on the social affect that food has:

http://nutritionwonderland.com/2009/08/social-side-eating/

The Three Approaches: 

Three approaches to analyze sociology

Functionalism is related to physiology

Parts come together to influence the whole

Comparison to the human body: that’s the goal

But the fatal flaws take a toll

A bit outdated now, its lost the poll

So we move on to structuralism, a way to look beyond the surface

The deeper foundation of society: thats the purpose

That Levi-Strauss hoped for as a universal theme

Apply rules and laws for more than what they seem

A triangle to examine the transformation of food

But someone didn’t agree, Mennell was the dude

So we move on to analyzing the developmental method

One commonality is what it had suggested:

Taking into consideration past forms of social form

Mennell, Goody, and others defined these norms

Such as the influence of external and internal constraints

And the idea of gastro-anatomy that Fischler paints

All in all, these three concepts can be used

To understand the social workings of the thing we eat: FOOD.